Intermedia
THE FUTUR OF DIGITAL CONTENTS' DISTRIBUTION
  • Sophie Boudet-Dalbin

    Docteur en sciences de l'information et de la communication (SIC) de l'Université Paris 2 Panthéon-Assas, je travaille sur la distribution des contenus numériques.

    Ma recherche doctorale, pluridisciplinaire, est une étude prospective qui vise à trouver des solutions concrètes pour la distribution des films par Internet, en mesure de dépasser les stéréotypes et de réconcilier les motivations et contraintes des divers acteurs économiques, créateurs, publics internautes et entités nationales.
    ....................................

    Doctor in Information and Communication Sciences at the University Paris 2 Panthéon-Assas, I focus on digital content distribution.

    My PhD, multidisciplinary, aimes at finding concrete solutions for digital distribution of films, that would outreach stereotypes as well as reconcile the motivations and constraints of the various economic actors, creators, audience, Internet users and national entities.


  • Archive pour mars 2007

    27
    03
    2007

    NBC & News Corp: response against YouTube?

    The news popped up on Thursday, March 22. NBC and News Corp, the two industry giants in media and entertainment are joining forces to build a new network for showing their content on the Web. The announcement comes barely a week after Viacom filed a copyright-infringement lawsuit against YouTube. In the battle between new and old media, it's getting pretty busy. The online video market builds itself up. Alliances are made. The nine-year-old law meant to govern copyright in the digital age (the DMCA of 98) seems already outdated. But one thing is sure, a businness model is imposing itself on the Internet: free content financed by advertising.

    The Web site is supposed to be launched in the US at the beginning of the summer 2007. It has not been named yet. NBC and News Corp's content will also be broadcasted on Web portals like AOL (Time Warner), MSN (Microsoft), MySpace (News Corp) and Yahoo. The two groups' TV shows, video clips and movies (Universal Picture and 20th Century Fox) will be available for free in streaming. The customers will be able to pay and download to own some movies, like on the Apple's iTunes Store. Furthermore, the users will have the possibility of uploading their own videos. NBC and News Corp will split advertising revenue and the host sites will get a cut from the advertising that is shown on their sites.

    Is it really a response against YouTube? News Corp President Peter Chermin says it is not designed to be a YouTube-killer. In fact, he spoke with Google (YouTube parent company) chief executive Eric Schmidt about joining the venture. We don't know the negotiations' result yet. The objective seems to be a broadcasting over many sites. The image quality on the partners' sites could make the difference. However, even with lesser quality videos, can YouTube hegemony be offset? And is that really the point?

    Tags: , ,
    Publié dans ENGLISH |

    Aucun commentaire

    27
    03
    2007

    NBC & News Corp : riposte anti-YouTube ?

    La nouvelle est tombée jeudi 22 mars. NBC et News Corp, les deux géants américains des médias, s'allient pour créer un nouveau réseau de diffusion de leurs contenus vidéos sur Internet. Le projet a été annoncé à peine une semaine après que Viacom ait déposé plainte contre YouTube pour violation des droits d'auteur. Dans le conflit qui oppose nouveaux et anciens médias, les actions fusent. Le marché de la vidéo en ligne s'organise. Les alliances se forment. La loi américaine relative au droit d'auteur à l'ère numérique (la DMCA de 98) est sur la sellette. Mais une chose est sûre, un modèle économique est en train de s'imposer sur Internet : le contenu vidéo gratuit, financé par la publicité.

    Le lancement de la plate-forme de diffusion est prévue pour le début de l'été 2007, outre-Atlantique. Le projet n'a pas encore de nom définitif. NBC et News Corp distribueront également leur contenu sur plusieurs portails Internet, comme AOL (Time Warner), MSN (Microsoft), MySpace (News Corp) et Yahoo. Programmes télévisés, vidéo-clips et films (Universal Picture et 20th Century Fox) des deux groupes seront disponibles gratuitement en streaming. Certain films pourront être téléchargés et conservés contre paiement, à l'image de l'iTunes Store d'Apple. De plus, les internautes auront la possibilité de mettre en ligne leurs propres vidéos. Selon le modèle envisagé, la plate-forme sera donc financée par la publicité qui apparaîtra sur les portails.

    Peut-on qualifier cet accord de « riposte anti-YouTube » ? Peter Chermin, directeur exécutif de News Corp, certifie le contraire. Il a d'ailleurs contacté Eric Schmidt, le patron de Google (propriétaire de YouTube), pour lui proposer de se joindre à l'initiative. Le résultat des négociations est encore inconnu. L'objectif semble être une diffusion sur le plus de supports possibles. La qualité de l'image sur les sites partenaires pourrait faire la différence. Cependant, même avec des vidéos de moindre qualité, l'hégémonie de YouTube peut-elle vraiment être contrebalancée ? Et est-ce vraiment le propos ?

    Tags: , ,
    Publié dans FRANCAIS |

    Aucun commentaire

    21
    03
    2007

    YouTube: an illegal business model?

    More than $1 billion in damages and an injunction prohibiting Google from further copyright infringement: that is what Viacom seeks. Tuesday, March 13th, Viacom finally filed a lawsuit, accusing Google of « massive intentional copyright infringement ». Since it bought YouTube last October, Google has been chasing deals that would give it the right to put mainstream video programming on the site. The tensions between new and old media companies are now visible.

    In a press release, Viacom, the parent company of MTV, Comedy Central, Nickelodeon, Paramount and DreamWorks, accuses YouTube of developing a « clearly illegal business model », « exploiting the devotion of fans to others' creative works in order to enrich itself and its corporate parent Google ». Almost 160,000 unauthorized clips of Viacom would have been available on YouTube and viewed more than 1.5 billion times. In the philosophical and financial battle between media and tech companies, Viacom made a move that could prove to be decisive for the future of on line video distribution.

    Google openly express its ambition of becoming the leader of online video, like the Apple's iTunes Store for music. Google plans to combine YouTube's vast audience with its mastery of online advertising technology to create a lucrative business whose revenue it will share with large media companies and other content creators.

    YouTube has succeeded in signing licensing deals with content providers, like the BBC, CBS, Fox, NBC Universal, Time Warner and the NBA, that will allow it not only to gain rights to programming, but also to insulate itself from any liability for past copyright violations on YouTube. Thus, some prefer finding a deal because of the strong promotional power of YouTube. However, as the negotiations have dragged on, major media companies have grown increasingly frustrated over the proliferation of copyrighted video on YouTube. Indeed, they have to scour every day the entirety of what is available on the site to look for their content.

    Google sees itself as leading a revolution of video consumption and distribution. But from now on Viacom wants to take a fair share of this new market that benefits from the rapid expansion of online advertising. The stakes are high. It is about attracting the new costumers' generation, going where the audience goes.

    In legal terms the suit relies on the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) of 1998, which made it illegal to deploy technology intended to circumvent legitimate copyrights. But the law included a so-called « safe harbor » provision, which indemnified some kinds of Internet companies if they immediately blocked or removed such content when a copyright holder informed them it was there. The resolution of this lawsuit, if it comes to trial, will hinge on the interpretation of this provision.

    Google declares itself to be protected by the DMCA. Viacom is convinced of the contrary. The major claims that unlike internet providers who really have no idea about what is flowing through their channels, Google is an active participant with its users. From one side, it is unclear whether YouTube encourages the people to infringe on copyrights. Google has also always promptly removed the copyrighted content when asked to do so. On the other side, the financial benefit that Google is getting from the business model could rule against it.

    This battle is the symptom of a war between old and new media, two different points of view about what is happening on the Internet, and what should happen. One side wants to create software that enables people and companies of all size and importance to communicate and gain power, and the other side wants to retain control of content they have spent a lot of money to create.

    Let's take the music industry's example. Innovations first came from software companies, with some mistakes indeed, like Napster. Then, the major media companies reacted after. And if the illegal downloading seems to have lowered, it is less because of lawsuit fear than because of the development of a convenient and affordable way to get music legally.

    Tags: , , ,
    Publié dans ENGLISH |

    Aucun commentaire

    21
    03
    2007

    YouTube : un modèle économique illégal ?

    Un milliard de dollars de dommages et intérêts. Une injonction de cesser de violer les droits d'auteur à l'avenir. C'est ce que réclame Viacom, le géant des médias américains. Mardi 13 mars, Viacom a déposé plainte contre YouTube pour « violation massive et intentionnelle des droits d'auteur ». Depuis que Google a racheté YouTube en octobre dernier, le géant des médias en ligne a tenté de conclure des accords avec les majors afin de pouvoir diffuser leur contenu sur son site de partage vidéo. Les tensions entre nouveaux et anciens médias sont désormais apparentes.

    Dans un communiqué de presse, Viacom (MTV, Paramount, DreamWorks, Comedy Central, Nickelodeon, etc.) accuse Google de développer un « modèle économique clairement illégal », exploitant la dévotion des fans et bénéficiant de recettes publicitaires en partie induites par du contenu piraté. Environ 160 000 vidéos du contenu de Viacom auraient été mises en ligne sur le site de partage vidéo et visionnées plus de 1,5 milliards de fois. Dans la bataille économico-philosophique que se livrent les nouveaux médias et les industries du divertissement, Viacom lance une offensive qui pourrait se révéler décisive pour le futur de la distribution de contenu audiovisuel en ligne.

    Google ne cache pas son ambition de devenir le leader de la vidéo en ligne, à l'image de l'iTunes Store d'Apple pour la musique. La vaste audience de YouTube combinée à sa maîtrise de la publicité en ligne représentent pour Google un commerce lucratif, dont il envisage de partager les revenus avec les grandes industries des médias et autres créateurs de contenu. YouTube a déjà noué plus de mille partenariats de diffusion (avec notamment la BBC, CBS, Fox, NBC Universal, Time Warner et la NBA).

    Certaines majors ont ainsi autorisé la diffusion légale de leur contenu sur YouTube en échange d'un partage des revenus publicitaires. Elles préfèrent trouver un accord pour une compensation financière car le célèbre site de partage vidéo demeure un formidable outil promotionnel. Mais les accords sont difficiles à finaliser et la prolifération sur YouTube de vidéos protégées par les droits d'auteur ne fait qu'augmenter la colère des majors. Celles-ci doivent en effet quotidiennement passer en revue tous les clips en ligne sur YouTube pour voir si leur contenu en fait partie.

    Google veut devenir le fer de lance d'une révolution des modes de consommation et de distribution vidéo. Mais Viacom revendique désormais sa part du gâteau. Avec l'essor de la publicité en ligne, l'enjeu est de taille. Il s'agit d'attirer la nouvelle génération de clients, d'aller là où va l'audience.

    D'un point de vue légal, le Digital Millennium Copyright Act de 1998 (DMCA) interdit le contournement des mesures techniques de protection (tout comme la loi DADVSI en France). Cependant, un amendement (le « Safe Harbor ») protège les sites Internet qui contiennent du contenu pirate posté par les utilisateurs, tant que les sites le suppriment immédiatement sur demande de l'ayant droit. Le verdict de cette action en justice, si cela va jusqu'au procès, dépendra de l'interprétation de cet amendement.

    Google affirme être protégé par le DMCA. Viacom est persuadé du contraire. La compagnie affirme qu'à la différence des fournisseurs d'accès à Internet, qui n'ont vraiment aucune idée de ce qui circule à travers leur réseau, Google est en contact direct avec ses clients. D'un côté, rien ne prouve que YouTube encourage les internautes à violer les droits d'auteur. Google a également toujours réagi promptement lorsque les ayants-droit le lui ont demandé. D'un autre côté, le bénéfice financier que Google tire de ce modèle économique peut très bien jouer en sa défaveur.

    Cette bataille est le symptôme d'une guerre que se livrent anciens et nouveaux médias, deux points de vue différents sur le développement d'Internet. Ceux qui veulent créer des logiciels pour permettre aux individus et entreprises de communiquer et évoluer, et ceux qui veulent garder le contrôle d'un contenu qu'ils ont créé et dans lequel ils ont investi beaucoup d'argent.

    Prenons l'exemple de l'industrie du disque. Les innovations sont venues des entreprises logicielles. Avec son lots de ratés, comme Napster. Les majors ont quant à elles réagi avec un temps de retard. Et si le téléchargement illégal semble avoir diminué, c'est moins par peur du procès que grâce au développement d'une offre légale créative et adaptée à la demande.

    Tags: , , , ,
    Publié dans FRANCAIS |

    Aucun commentaire

    7
    03
    2007

    New Ways of Sharing Ad Money With YouTube Celebrities

    Some YouTube contributors are feeling like hot commodities, being wooed by the site's competitors with promises of guaranteed exposure and/or a share of advertising money. The most popular YouTubers generate millions of visits and tens of thousands of subscribers. It only seems fair that the YouTube stars have their piece of the cake. Thus, the video sites, like YouTube, Google Video or Revvers, that earn advertising revenues, could not continue to exploit quality user-generated content without paying for it. So, last January, Chad Hurly, YouTube's co-founder, said the company would in the coming months begin sharing advertising revenue with contributors. In the meantime, competitors are taking action.

    In an article from last February 26, the New York Times reveals that Metacafe proposes $5 for every 1,000 views, with their most popular acts netting tens of thousands of dollars. YouTube could share about 20 per cent of ad money gleaned from each video clip with the clip's producer. Until then, the famous video site has been stung by the departure of its most popular acts. Lonelygirl15, an online show about the exploits of a fictitious teenager, left for Revver, which pays producers half of all advertising revenue. The comedy duo Smosh is now exclusively on Live Video. As every TV network, film studio and record label has done for decades, the video sharing sites are thus trying proactively to sign talents.

    YouTube is by far the most popular video site on the Web, with about 26 million visitors in December, according to the Internet statistics firm comScore Media Metrix. Yahoo Video arrives in second position, with 22 million. As for the most important independant site, it is Heavy, with 6.5 millon visits. YouTube can expect hardball tactics from competitors given the economic stakes. But no YouTube competitor can boast of getting millions of eyeballs in a week. The rivals have to pay cash, money that comes from ads. And what advertisers want is to see millions of eyeballs.

    Revvers well understood this. The site, which earns ad revenues based on the number of clip views, encourages producers to distribute their videos on as many sites as possible, without exclusivity. The strategy is to let creators know the rival sites have also a great system. What the amateur producers want first is fame. Fortune comes after. The video sites give them exposure and feedback from the public. Thus, they can get some experience. While hoping video blogging might become some kind of career, one can wait for the YouTube proposition, which will hopefully be profitable for everybody.

    Tags: ,
    Publié dans ENGLISH |

    Aucun commentaire

    7
    03
    2007

    Vers une rétribution des contenus amateurs

    Certains contributeurs de YouTube sont devenus de vraies stars, démarchées par les sites concurrents, qui leurs offrent des garanties d'exposition et/ou un partage des revenus publicitaires. Les producteurs-amateurs les plus populaires génèrent des millions de visites et des dizaines de centaines d'inscriptions au site. Il apparaît légitime que les stars de YouTube aient leur part du gâteau. Les portails vidéos, comme YouTube, Google Video ou Revvers, qui récoltent des revenus publicitaires, ne pouvaient pas continuer à exploiter ainsi un contenu amateur de qualité sans le rétribuer. En janvier dernier, Chad Hurly, co-fondateur de YouTube, a ainsi annoncé que l'entreprise allait dans les mois à venir partager ses revenus publicitaires avec les contributeurs. En attendant, la concurrence s'active.

    Dans un article du 26 février dernier, le New York Times révèle que Metacafe propose 5 dollars tous les 1 000 visionnages. Ce qui peut représenter des dizaines de milliers de dollars pour les vidéos les plus visionnées. YouTube pourrait quant à lui partager environs 20 pour cent des recettes publicitaires obtenues pour chaque clip avec son producteur. En attendant, le célèbre portail vidéo a été piqué à vif par le départ de certains de ses contributeurs les plus populaires. Lonelygirl15, véritable buzz, auteur d'une série de vidéos en forme de journal intime d'une adolescente, est parti sur Revver, qui donne la moitié de tous ses revenus publicitaires à ses producteurs. Le duo comique Smosh est désormais en exclusivité sur Live Video. Tout comme les réseaux TV, les studios de cinéma et les labels de musique le font depuis toujours, les sites de partage de vidéos tentent ainsi de signer les talents de façon pro-active.

    YouTube est de loin le portail vidéo le plus populaire, avec environs 26 millions de visites en décembre, selon le service de mesure sur Internet comScore Media Metrix. Yahoo Video arrive en deuxième position, avec 22 millions. Quand au site indépendant le plus important, il s'agit de Heavy, avec 6,5 millons de visiteurs. YouTube peut s'attendre à ce que ses concurrents emploient les grands moyens étant donné les enjeux financiers. Mais aucun concurrent ne peut se vanter d'attirer des millions d'internautes en moins d'une semaine. Les autres sites doivent alors payer cash. De l'argent qui provient des publicités. Et ce que veulent les publicitaires, c'est avoir une audience de millions d'internautes.

    Revvers l'a bien compris. le site, qui perçoit ses revenus publicitaires sur la base du nombre de visionnage des clips, encourage ses contributeurs à distribuer leurs vidéos sur le plus grand nombre de sites possible, sans exclusivité. La stratégie est de rentrer en contact avec les stars de YouTube et de leur montrer que les portails concurrents marchent tout aussi bien. Ce que recherchent ces producteurs-amateurs, c'est principalement le succès. La fortune vient après. Les portails vidéos leur apportent visibilité et feed-back de la part du public. Ils peuvent ainsi « se faire la main » et acquérir une certaine expérience. En attendant qu'il soit possible de faire carrière dans le « video blogging », espérons que YouTube fera une proposition profitable pour tout le monde.

    Tags: ,
    Publié dans FRANCAIS |

    Aucun commentaire

    4
    03
    2007

    Le P2P au service d'Hollywood

    Depuis lundi, il est possible de télécharger des films en toute légalité sur le site de BitTorrent. La compagnie a finalement réussi à convaincre les studios hollywoodiens de sa bonne foi, moyennant tout de même quelques concessions. L'offre de distribution numérique de films ne semble pas encore prête à s'ajuster à la demande.

    Le site BitTorent.com propose plus de 3.000 films, issus des catalogues de la 20th Century Fox, Paramount, Warner Brothers et MGM, disponibles légalement, moyennant 3,99 dollars pour les nouveautés et 2,99 dollars pour les films plus anciens, comme « Reservoir Dogs ». Une fois le film sur l'ordinateur, il expire sous 30 jours suivant l'achat ou 24 heures après le début du visionnage. Il s'agit d'un service de location. Pas d'achat possible. Les majors en auraient exigé un prix trop élevé pour être attractif.

    L'avantage de BitTorrent réside dans sa rapidité de téléchargement. Cette technologie peer-to-peer (P2P), introduite par M. Cohen en 2001, permet le transfert depuis différents « pairs » pour un même fichier (multisourcing) et le morcellement du fichier en blocs. Le réseau montre toute son efficacité lorsqu'il y a beaucoup d'utilisateurs. Plus il y a de monde qui télécharge, plus il y a de monde qui partage. Dans son dernier communiqué de presse, la société dénombre 135 millions clients existants. Reste à savoir si ces anciens utilisateurs, habitués à se servir de BitTorrent pour obtenir gratuitement des films pirates, seront massivement séduits par cette nouvelle formule payante. Le peu d'utilisateurs du service pourraient alors atténuer l'avantage comparatif de BitTorrent sur ses concurrents.

    Le marché de la distribution de films par Internet commence à prendre forme. Certains sites de vidéo à la demande (VOD), proposent les films à la location et à l'achat (Amazon Unbox, Movielink), avec des formules d'abonnement (MovieFlix, Vongo), avec la possibilité de graver le film sur DVD (CinemaNow). D'autres sites se définissent plutôt comme des magasins en ligne, avec système et terminal de lecture propriétaires (iTunes Store, Xbox Live Marketplace). Des acteurs hybrides (Blockbuster, Netflix) proposent aussi un système d'abonnement, de location et d'achat de DVD en ligne, mais avec distribution postale. Enfin, des portails vidéos offrent du contenu posté par les internautes (à l'image du désormais célèbre YouTube), avec du contenu professionnel à l'achat ou à la location (Google Video). Les modèles économiques varient donc sensiblement. Mais BitTorrent et ses rivaux ont tous en commun un même défi : prouver à l'internaute que louer un film en ligne est plus convivial et moins contraignant que de se déplacer au vidéo club. Ils doivent également rivaliser avec le téléchargement illégal, qui demeure important.

    Mais comment convaincre des internautes habitués à obtenir les films gratuitement, à choisir dans un vaste catalogue, à pouvoir lire les vidéos sur n'importe quel terminal et les échanger avec leur entourage en toute liberté. Selon BitTorrent, 34 pour cent des utilisateurs de leur système seraient prêts à payer pour un service légal garantissant la qualité des fichiers. Cependant, les handicaps demeurent. Les DRM imposées par les studios ne permettent de visionner le film téléchargé que sur un seul ordinateur. Pas de possibilité de transférer le ficher par Internet, vers un autre poste ou même vers un baladeur numérique. Des solutions de distribution sans DRM (à l'image de l'initiative de Warner Music France) seraient à l'étude avec les partenaires. Mais rien n'est encore fait. En outre, la pauvreté du catalogue, l'absence de médiation œuvre-public, le manque de contenu gratuit, laissent à penser que l'offre n'a pas réellement cherché à comprendre la demande.

    BitTorrent arrive tout de même à innover en s'appuyant de manière paradoxale sur le réseau P2P pour proposer une offre payante, tout comme Peer Impact le fait depuis août 2005. Même si des firmes non-affiliées à BitTorrent continuent à proposer des films pirates via des versions et des sites Internet du logiciel open source, l'entreprise californienne entend bien gagner en respectabilité et vendre la technologie à d'autres magasins de films en ligne ou directement aux studios. BitTorrent permet en effet de transmettre des fichiers lourds pour un coût très inférieur à celui des autres systèmes actuellement sur le marché.

    Les studios hollywoodiens, quant à eux, entendent bien remettre les pirates sur le droit chemin de l'offre légale. L'essentiel n'est-il pas de participer ! Reste à voir si le public suivra.

    Tags: , ,
    Publié dans FRANCAIS |

    Aucun commentaire

    4
    03
    2007

    When P2P Gets Work in Hollywood

    On Monday, it was possible to download movies legally on the BitTorrent Web site. The company finally succeeded in convincing the Hollywood studios of its sincerity, in return however for some concessions. Supply of digital film distribution doesn’t seem ready to adjust itself to demand just yet.

    The online media store offers around 3,000 movies legally available for purchase, coming from 20th Century Fox, Paramount, Warner Brothers and MGM. New releases cost $3.99, while older movies like « Reservoir Dogs » cost $2.99. Once the films are on the personal computer, they expire within 30 days of purchase or 24 hours after the buyer begins to watch them. BitTorrent only rents movies; it doesn’t permit users to buy outright digital copies. The studios wanted to charge prices that would be too high for most consumers.

    BitTorrent’s big advantage lies in its speedy downloads. This peer-to-peer (P2P) technology introduced by Mr. Cohen in 2001 allows a single file to be broken into small fragments that are distributed among computers. To be efficient, there have to be many users connected. The more people are downloading, the more people are sharing. In its last press release the company said the user base number was 135 million. It is still not sure if the previous users, accustomed to using BitTorrent to obtain free pirated movies, would be willing to pay for this new formula en masse. Having fewer customers would then reduce the comparative advantage of BitTorrent with regard to its competitors.

    The market of film distribution through the Internet is starting to take shape. Some video on demand (VOD) Web sites offer movies to rent and buy (Amazon Unbox, Movielink), with subscription fees (MovieFlix, Vongo) and with the possibility to burn a DVD (CinemaNow). Some other sites are more online stores with proprietary systems and devices (iTunes Store, Xbox Live Marketplace). Then, some hybrid actors (Blockbuster, Netflix) propose online subscribtion, renting and buying of DVDs, but with postal distribution. Finally, some video sites offer user-generated content (like the now-famous YouTube), with some professional content for buying or renting (Google Video). Thus, there are various business models. However, BitTorrent and its rivals all face the same challenge: they must get consumers to look at this as a better and more reliable way to watch a movie as compared to renting a DVD. There is also the illegal economy in pirated video content, whose size dwarfs that of the legal online media stores.

    But then, how to convince people used to snatching up files off the Web with virtually no DRM and at no cost, to choosing among a vast programming, to reading the videos on any terminal and to exchanging them freely with peers? According to BitTorrent, 34 percent of its users would pay for content if a comprehensive, legal service were available. Some problems lie nevertheless in the way. The DRM imposed by the majors allow the film to be watched on only one computer. It is not possible to transfer the file through the Internet, to another PC or even a portable device. BitTorrent and its partners would probably explore DRM-free options. But nothing is done yet. What is more, the programming poverty, the absence of public-work mediation, the lack of free content, lead one to think that supply did not really try to understand demand.

    BitTorrent, however, successfully innovated by using the P2P network in a paradoxal way to propose a legal offer, as Peer Impact has done since August 2005. Even if companies not affiliated with BitTorrent continue offering pirated movies via versions and Web sites of this open source software, the firm wants to gain respectability and to sell the technology to other media stores and to the studios themselves. Indeed, it can help content companies transmit big files for significantly less money on a cost-per-basis than other content delivery companies.

    The studios hope the new system will put a dent in the illegal trading of their content. What’s most important is to participate, isn’t it? We will now see if the public follows.

    Tags: , ,
    Publié dans ENGLISH |

    Aucun commentaire